Grammar Pet Peeves

frown applePet peeve – courtesy of Wikipedia – en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pet_peeve
A pet peeve or pet hate is a minor annoyance that an individual identifies as particularly annoying to himself or herself, to a greater degree than others may find it.

As a writer I have some words that I try very hard to irradiate from my writings; like ‘very’, ‘just’, and ‘that’. They usually make it in during the race to finish a first draft and are hunted down like lousy vermin during the editing phase.

As the publishing world is changing rapidly and editors are leaving NYC publishers to freelance for self-publishers I’m noticing an alarming amount of typos, grammar mistakes, and stuff that is just plain wrong in even major publishers/authors works that are costing me $25.99 a pop for hardcover.

As self-publishers or Indies are hiring editors and proofreaders and making use of Beta readers I’m seeing the gulf between traditional and Indie books evaporating. As one person commented on a bulletin board, I’m willing to excuse typos if they are understandable. Such as bad and baf for example. The letters are right next to each other on the keyboard and that form of typo is easy to make. Others, not so much, which is where my pet peeves come in!

Hoard/Horde – I read a lot of zombie apocalypse books so this one comes up frequently. They are two different words. They are not interchangeable. You can only have a hoard of zombies if you are stockpiling them in the closet.

Pored/Poured – You are not pouring over documents unless you have a bottle of maple syrup in your hand. Pore – to study carefully.

Site/Sight – Again, not interchangeable. Site – a location. Sight – seeing. We are going to the site. The enemy was sighted.

My husband laughs when I groan and bitch about horde and hoard. They are called pet peeves for a reason. They may irk you and nobody else. ๐Ÿ™‚

What are your pet peeves? In grammar or reading in general.


Jill James, author of Love in the Time of Zombies, Book 1 – Time of Zombies
(If you ever find a hoard of zombies in my books, please let me know)

 

 

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About Jill James

Jill is a published author with The Wild Rose Press and self-published with The Lake Willowbee Series. She enjoys reading just as much as writing. You can follow her on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/Jill.James.author and Twitter @jill_james
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22 Responses to Grammar Pet Peeves

  1. leighmorgan1 says:

    I can’t stand it when I read or hear supposedly erudite characters say: “anyways”. Every time I hear it or read it—although it’s more often heard than read—I cringe. If you have to say: “anyway”, please leave the ‘s’ at home, preferably in the garbage disposal.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Jill James says:

      Same with toward. The British spelling has an ‘s’ at the end, American does not.

      Liked by 1 person

      • E. Ayers says:

        Uh, oh! I’m in trouble. I always say towards and write towards. Actually both spellings and pronunciations are correct. I also say either and neither funny according to everyone else. But I stuck with the sloppy “bin” for been instead of be-en. My mom was always on me about stuff like that. She said I sounded as though I’d been raised in a barn when I “slurred” my words. I’d remind her that I preferred the barn. I was so bad!

        Liked by 1 person

        • Jill James says:

          E., I had trouble with were for the longest time when I was a child. My mom would spell it for me and two sentences later I needed her to spell it again. If I close my eyes I see the word, but that one just didn’t compute.

          Like

  2. E. Ayers says:

    It’s very difficult to teach children proper English when they don’t hear it spoken by their peers. There was a time when reading was a source of good grammar, and when surrounded with books, people tended to learn just by constantly reading. Not any more! Books are no longer properly edited. Something will always slip through the editing process, but too many good stories have been ruined because of poor edits.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Jill James says:

      E., I hear you. There have been so many books I wanted to give 5 stars to for the story, but had to make it 4 because of spelling, typos, and grammar mistakes. I blame Autocorrect for most of our problems. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      • I do the same thing with my reviews! In my opinion, a 5-star book should be properly edited with few (or better still, no) errors.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Jill James says:

          Sandra, I’ll allow a few, but like the one I’m reading now, I’m just about ready to delete it from my Kindle. I don’t return books, life is too short to deal with that for a free or 99 cent book, which most of the post-apocalyptic books I’m reading right now are.

          Liked by 1 person

        • E. Ayers says:

          It’s virtually impossible to have no errors. Even the best grammarians can’t agree on certain commas. Really, it’s all about clarity. Poor sentence structure will cause you to stop reading as the brain goes “huh?” Do that to me too many times and I’m not a happy reader.

          Liked by 1 person

  3. Joan Leacott says:

    My pet peeve isn’t a word. It’s table manners. When was it OK to poke a fork toward your dinner companion? Do that to me, and I’m gone.

    Liked by 3 people

  4. I have too many pet peeves to list here! However, I do cringe when I hear someone refer to something as unique when, in fact, it is merely unusual. Unique means “one of a kind.”

    Liked by 2 people

  5. susanrhughes says:

    One of my pet peeves is “alright”. Another is “quality” used as an adjective. Also I see “peaked his interest” quite a bit. And “straight-laced”. Too many others to list. I’m not saying I’m perfect. I’m a professional editor, but I still make mistakes and learn new things about word usage all the time.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I have a few grammar pet peeves but first I have to vent about the Big 5. I find it insulting that the Big 5 are charging over $13 per ebook and there are so many grammatical errors in said ebook it curls the hairs on my head! AND then the Big 5 (and their critics) says the indies are inferior to them! ARGH!

    Okay, one of my pet peeves is when there are commas when there shouldn’t be. Some authors go a little overboard and it grates on my nerves.

    Great post! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 3 people

    • Jill James says:

      Thanks for stopping by our blog. I get you on the commas, although I usually don’t see enough. I think some authors are afraid of missing some so go overboard with caution. Last night I was reading a Big 5 book and it had not only past in a place where passed should have been, but a whole page with the wrong character’s name in a scene.

      Liked by 2 people

    • E. Ayers says:

      The Big 5 assume the book has come to them edited. Indies have spoiled the Big 5. Unfortunately there are plenty of folks self-publishing and are doing it without edits. And many Indies have such poor grammar skills that they don’t know when they are getting poor edits.

      I find that most Indies are putting out higher quality books than the Big 5. And probably 25% of the Indies are putting out the best books in terms of story lines and quality writing. Unfortunately, they are not being discovered!

      Liked by 3 people

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