Happy Holidays, and Size Does Count

We hope that no matter what you celebrate that the season has been kind to you.

I think the Authors of Main Street took a few days off from posting this month.  The holidays sort of all come together in December. Except we on Main Street forgot to warn each other and to warn you, our faithful blog readers, that we were going to be busy. Like wayward children we hope in the spirit of the holidays that we’re forgiven.

This Christmas came a day early for me. My youngest daughter couldn’t be with the family this year. She spent most of the day in the hospital’s ER. Don’t feel sorry for her; she’s ducky fine. She’s one of people who gave up a day at home with family to be there for others who need her more. She’s an RN. She was on her regular work schedule.

As a family, we had to celebrate without her. But we didn’t forget about her.  Like so many people, we lacked one of our loved ones. At least we knew she was alive and well, and only a few miles away providing comfort and care to those who needed it. Many families aren’t that lucky.

Christmas Eve was our family dinner. Just immediate family, my oldest daughter, the men that my girls love and my two granddaughters plus, one granddaughter’s boyfriend were at my oldest daughter’s house. (My granddaughter is allowed to have a boyfriend, she’s over 21. The question is – am I allowed to call him a boyfriend?)  Dinner was delicious! And I didn’t have to cook any of it!

My gift from the family was a beautiful computer monitor that is huge! Just in time for another set of edits! I  love the monitor and I love my girls for giving it to me! Even the granddaughters chipped into it. Don’t ask if it’s HD or any variety of letter combinations.  I’m the least techno-oriented author you know. It’s BIG! That’s all that matters.

See, size does count! I learned that when I was little. The bigger the tires, the easier it was to get through the snow. The larger the bank account, the better. And now it’s the large flash drives that count. And let’s not forget the large hard drives. It’s large and hard – oh yeah!

There’s a lot of things I can laugh about as this year comes to a close. It hasn’t been a bad year, if you stack it all together. There’s been worse years and there’s been better. I lost a good friend this year.  He was a few years older than I am. He taught me things about a camera that I never knew. After seeing my granddaughter’s photography when she was four years old, he taught my granddaughter even more about using a camera and encouraged her to continue with her photography. He called me one day and said he had something for me. I thought he was joking when he asked me to stop by his house. When I got there and he handed me one of his cameras and a super-duper lens, I broke into tears. I’d used that camera so many times when we worked on projects together, and he knew I couldn’t afford one for myself. He had bought a new one and decided that owning what he did was a bit much.  So he gave me one.  It seems like every year the grim reaper claims another friend a little too soon.

But on the brighter side, I have a book getting ready to release this spring. It’s undergoing some scrutiny within the Deaf community. It’s contemporary and a wee bit different from my other contemporary romances. The romance (love) is never in question, the relationship has a long path to travel. Why? He’s Deaf. She has her hearing and doesn’t know sign language. Her mother is dead-set against her marrying a disabled man. And like most Deaf, he doesn’t consider himself disabled. He thinks those with hearing have the problem because we don’t understand him. He understands us, so why can’t we understand him.

I’ve not created a super hero, I’ve merely presented a man who is Deaf, Deaf of Deaf, an average, young Deaf man. That might come as a shock. Most are well educated, underpaid but educated, many with advanced degrees.

Being deaf is considered legally a disability. It is difficult especially for those who have lost their hearing. But the Deaf of Deaf, those born deaf with deaf parents don’t consider themselves disabled at all unless they do have another problem. But deafness alone, no. That is not a disability. But if a person has lost their hearing, it is disabling.

I don’t know more than a few words in ASL, American Sign Language, and I can barely do the alphabet. I keep plugging away at it.  So it took lots of help to write this book and I’ve gotten involved with the Deaf community here in Tidewater, Virginia. Some look at me with suspicion because I seriously need to learn their language. Others are so friendly and welcoming. But every time I’ve gone to an event with them, I’ve had fun and learned something new.

So watch for my book Silent Journey to be published this Spring.  And yes, I’ll be back here on New Year’s Day.  May the year 2018 bring us all lots of wonderful things. And here on Main Street, we are planning a very exciting year for our readers. How about another boxed set this summer, plus our usual Xmas holiday one? That’s two in one year!

Here’s a little something for everyone.  Click on it for the link to download a full-sized version from Freepik. I use this company all the time! Mine is getting printed by month for my desk.  Yes, I have a calendar in my mobile phone. I just transfer all those appointments to the calendar by my computer. All I have to do is look up!

 

Calendar 2018. Vintage decorative elements Oriental pattern, vector illustration Vector       FREEPIX

HAPPY NEW YEAR 2018

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7 Responses to Happy Holidays, and Size Does Count

  1. leighmorgan1 says:

    Merry Christmas & Happy New Year, E.! Congrats on your up-coming release! I grew up next to a woman who organized bonfires with the deaf community in her backyard. I was invited often and showed up more than invited. It was more of a spiritual dance when they sang. Wish I knew more about this community. What I do know, is pretty spectacular.

    Liked by 1 person

    • E. Ayers says:

      I feel so honored to be accepted by the local community even though my ability to sign is almost zilch. They know I’m trying. They’ve challenged me to learn new words each time I come to an event. I promise ASL is not easy, but it’s still easier than learning a foreign language. So many of the signs make perfect sense. Doing it fast enough to have a conversation… I’m a long way from that. I must rely on paper and pencil.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Carol says:

    Kudos for you, E. I can only imagine how much time and patience it takes to learn ASL! Congratulations on your upcoming new book, Silent Journey.
    I’m glad your Christmas was wonderful, but I know you missed your other daughter celebrating the holiday with everyone,
    Happy New Year!

    Liked by 1 person

    • E. Ayers says:

      Thanks, Carol. It wasn’t easy to celebrate without her, but when considering how many people have close family members in other lands whose lives are in danger every day – it’s wasn’t too bad. She was nearby.

      Like

      • E. Ayers says:

        As for the ASL, that has been interesting. But the really fantastic part of learning about the Deaf and the Deaf community was been a real eye-opener for me. Growing up I always considered them as disabled. Oh, was I wrong! As a young adult I had some contact with another couple who were blind. They had a sighted baby. I began to see the difference between what I had been told and what was real. Then later, with the couple who were deaf. That’s when I realized they were as normal as apple pie. But it was while doing the research for this book that it hit me. They aren’t normal; they are extraordinary people who speak a different language.

        Oh dear, I must stop writing or I’ll have stuffed another blog post about deafness into here. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Jude Knight says:

    I have to read this book.

    Like

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